Getting Over That Cold

‘Tis the season for runny noses and sore throats. It’s easy to just brush it off and keep going on with your day, but not taking care of those early cold signs can lead to more serious illnesses. When you first feel your throat getting scratchy and your head hurting, take these precautionary tips to help you get over that darn cold.

  1. Rest. It seems simple but it’s so underappreciated. When you keep going and going, your body has to work harder to keep up, so when you’re feeling under the weather it just has to work that much harder. Take an afternoon (or longer) to relax, go to bed earlier and maybe push that snooze button just a few more times.
  2. Stay hydrated. Whatever is in your body needs to be expelled out of there. Water is usually good for this because oftentimes when we are sick, we get dehydrated from not wanting to eat or drink. But if you have a sore throat, try sipping some mint tea. It does wonders for the body.
  3. Add moisture to the air. One simple way to do this is with a humidifier. Besides a low hum, you won’t even notice it there. Oftentimes our throat and nose become dry which causes a lot of the harsh scratchies we feel.
  4. Relax. Sometimes we don’t feel that our bodies physically tense up from stress (even if we don’t feel stressed), which only adds to the growing cold. Stop, read a book, take a bath, do yoga.

November is American Diabetes Month

Did you know that 1 in 11 Americans today has diabetes? Despite its prevalence, diabetes is an invisible disease. It affects men and women, people young and old, and people of all races, shapes and sizes. Often there are no outward signs from the 29 million Americans who fight this chronic illness every day. That’s why there is a critical need to foster awareness and education while breaking down stereotypes, myths and misunderstandings about this growing public health crisis that affects so many of us.

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This is exactly why the American Diabetes Association marks each November as American Diabetes Month: to bring extra attention to the disease and the tens of millions of people affected by it.

This November, the organization will showcase real-life stories of friends, families and neighbors managing the day-to-day triumphs and challenges of diabetes. The 2016 campaign, sponsored by Colgate Total® (National Oral Care Strategic Partner) and Medtronic Diabetes®, invites us to use #ThisIsDiabetes to share our personal stories and to start a dialogue about what it really means to live with diabetes.

Diabetes is more than the medications and devices used to manage it. For many, diabetes dictates how they organize their day, what they eat at every meal, how they choose to be physically active and how they spend their money. People with diabetes can have health care costs that are 2.3 times higher than someone without diabetes, as type 1 and type 2 require very specific forms of treatment.

adm4Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and there is no known way to prevent it. Approximately 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1, which means their body does not produce any insulin. Insulin is critical in order for the body to transport glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into cells for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day to live.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of cases in the United States, and is caused when the body does not produce or use insulin properly. Risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes and having diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes). Some people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood glucose (sugar) with healthy eating and being active; other may require oral medications or insulin, especially as the disease progresses. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, as well as older adults.

Some women develop gestational diabetes, high blood glucose (sugar) levels during pregnancy, which requires treatment to protect the health of the mother and the baby. Gestational diabetes affects approximately 9.2 percent of pregnant women.

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There’s a way for everybody to participate during American Diabetes Month in November. Share your story, or encourage a friend or family member to share theirs using #ThisIsDiabetes. Be sure to also follow the American Diabetes Association on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

You can also update your Facebook profile picture to help raise awareness, sign up to become an advocate and donate to help the American Diabetes Association continue their critical work. To learn more and view #ThisIsDiabetes stories from around the country, check out diabetes.org/adm.